[U] New Practice And Procedure Order Coming, In Merck’s Federal Propecia®/Proscar® MDL in Brooklyn USDC

July 11, 2017 - 3 Responses

UPDATED @ Noon EDT: Looks like settlement talks are back on, here. . . .

I see some increased probability that the parties have active settlement discussions (and likely, on a global — state and federal — basis) underway, now. This is new — and is simply my conjecture, based on the fact that all discovery is stayed, until September 20, 2017. [End, update.]

The schedule of events — and timing for motions, may be changing — based on a telephonic conference hearing, yesterday. We will let you know, right here, with an update when now that the amended scheduling order is filed, through PACER. Here’s a bit — from the order entered this morning:

. . . .Discovery in this matter is stayed until September 20, 2017. Accordingly, the deadlines governing the remainder of discovery are hereby revised as follows.

1. Expert Depositions. All expert depositions must be completed by November 6, 2017.

2. Motions. All motions to exclude or limit expert testimony pursuant to Federal Rule of Evidence 702 and all dispositive motions shall be filed as follows:

a. Opening Briefs: November 27, 2017;

b. Opposition Briefs: December 27, 2017; and

c. Reply Briefs: January 10, 2018. . . .

The Court [still] anticipates that the First Bellwether Tranche shall be trial ready by March 2018. Following the entry of all orders disposing of all Daubert motions and dispositive motions, the Court will issue a scheduling order governing all trial related obligations, including the specific date for commencement of trial. . . .

Onward. There is no guarantee that there will be a global settlement — or any settlement, at all. But I think it more likely now, than it has been in at least the past three years.

नमस्ते

51 Years Ago, This Very Afternoon — Chicago Freedom Movement And MLK, Jr. — At Soldier Field…

July 10, 2017 - Leave a Response

It is with some truly-profound pride, and yet, all due humility, that each year I mark July 10.

This year, it happens that events above Jupiter dominate my morning’s thoughts, but by afternoon and evening — I will be pondering this. From WikiPedia, with my now departed father in law, in the upper far left, as he was hosting Dr. King that day (as President — of the local NAACP). . . smile.

. . . .About 35,000 persons jammed Chicago’s Soldier Field for Dr. King’s first giant ‘freedom rally’ since bringing his civil rights organizing tactics to the city. . . .” Other guests included Mahalia Jackson, Stevie Wonder, and Peter, Paul and Mary. By late July the Chicago Freedom Movement was staging regular rallies outside of Real Estate offices and marches into all-white neighborhoods on the city’s southwest and northwest sides.

The hostile and sometimes violent response of local whites, and the determination of civil rights activists to continue to crusade for an open housing law, alarmed City Hall and attracted the attention of the national press. During one demonstration King said that even in Alabama and Mississippi he had not encountered mobs as hostile to Blacks’ civil rights as those in Chicago. . . .

Now you know. Beaming with pride, and. . . later tonight — well done, Doc. . . . Well-done.

नमस्ते

[U] Space Science Saturday: I’ve Been Waiting A Year For This…

July 10, 2017 - Leave a Response

[Bumped, to top — for Monday morning. . . . And yes this means we will ignore 45’s disturbingly-unhinged tweets of this early morning — at least until tomorrow.]

Not long after twisty long legged Juno safely used a gravity-assist/breaking maneuver — to enter a stable orbit around mighty Jupiter (and another perfectly tiny copper-colored girl was born), I ran across this — and knew the day would come, when we would get direct observational proof. [And we’d have a “she’s one!” birthday party, to boot!]

Here almost exactly one year later, we are going to get that direct observational proof. At about 10 pm local time, on Monday night, July 10, 2017, Juno will whiz over (at the lowest altitude, and closest approach ever attempted) the largest storm on Jupiter — a yawning maw, some three times the size of the whole Earth. And it will almost certainly record temperatures that are hundreds of degrees hotter than the available, but faint sunlight would be capable of generating on its own.

Here is the NASA/JPL bit from last July:

. . . .NASA-funded research suggests that Jupiter’s Great Red Spot may be the mysterious heat source behind Jupiter’s surprisingly high upper atmospheric temperatures. . . .

Here on Earth, sunlight heats the atmosphere at altitudes well above the surface—for example, at 250 miles above our planet where the International Space Station orbits. Scientists have been stumped as to why temperatures in Jupiter’s upper atmosphere are comparable to those found at Earth, yet Jupiter is more than five times the distance from the sun. They wanted to know: if the sun isn’t the heat source, then what is?. . . .

“The extremely high temperatures observed above the storm appear to be the ‘smoking gun’ of this energy transfer,” said O’Donoghue. “This tells us that planet-wide heating is a plausible explanation for the ‘energy crisis,’ a problem in which upper-atmospheric temperatures are measured hundreds of degrees hotter than can be explained by sunlight alone. . . .”

NASA’s Juno spacecraft, which recently arrived at Jupiter, will have several opportunities during its 20-month mission to observe the Great Red Spot and the turbulent region surrounding it. Juno will peer hundreds of miles downward into the atmosphere with its microwave radiometer, which passively senses heat coming from within the planet. This capability will enable Juno to reveal the deep structure of the Great Red Spot, along with other prominent Jovian features, such as the colorful cloud bands. . . . [posted July 29, 2016]

Do go read the link, to understand how the massive storm’s gravity waves, and acoustic compression waves, crashing into one another, are thought to generate the excess heat. Indeed — onward, and fittingly so — to a perfect copper colored one year old baby girl’s. . . birthday party, in a few hours. Grinning ear to ear, now — on a sunny, hot and humid morning here. . . . We hope you enjoy yours, as well. . . . of course, it will take a few weeks to download the data, from Juno’s solid state memory array. So we will be — as ever — patiently waiting.

नमस्ते

Sunday Political Stuff; Forgive Us — Weekly Roundup

July 9, 2017 - Leave a Response

Out west, in the Ninth Circuit (and in the District Court of Hawaii), lawyers for the State of Hawaii are bouncing back and forth between courthouses in seeking an order that Mr. Trump cannot (consistent with the Supremes’ grant of cert.) exclude grandparents of people from the six countries who have bona fide ties to our nation (i.e., their grandchildren) — all of which simply preserves pre-existing law.

And now, in response to anonymous commentary during the week — we address the case for obstruction against 45; preceded by Turner v. US, decided two weeks ago by the Supremes. While the exculpatory evidence withheld may not have been outcome determinative, that ought not be the test — in my view. When a prosecutor acts intentionally (as here) to withhold exculpatory so-called Brady evidence, there must be a consequence to the prosecutor for that breach of constitutional duties. Even if actual innocence may not be proved thereby. I think Justice Kagan’s dissent is well-framed.

We the citizens need to know that our law enforcement arms “obey the law,” themselves. This is a sad case — and hopefully will be limited to its very narrow and unique fact pattern. In short, it ought to become a largely dead letter — outside this specific fact pattern. [Much of the conviction rested on the notion that the convicted acted as part of a mob of others — and there were in fact multiple witnesses who said so.]

And, turning now to the case for obstruction against 45, I agree with the commentator’s implied view that Slate’s take on it all is cogent — and the case is quite strong (as Slate makes plain), in my view. Here’s a bit:

. . . .Clearing the room before he allegedly raised the Flynn matter with Comey is strong evidence the president knew what he was doing was “improper.” It is also impossible to see how Trump’s purpose here can be deemed “proper” without placing the president above the law. Even the president’s keenest defenders must concede that attempting to stop the Flynn matter by offering a bribe to Comey or threatening his family, physically or economically, would have been improper.

Trump’s alleged actions were somewhat less flagrant here. But courts have ruled, for example, that an attorney can be charged with obstruction when engaging in conduct that would otherwise be ordinary and allowable for a lawyer—like filing lawsuits or giving advice to witnesses—if the lawyer does so for the purpose of protecting himself or his associates from prosecution. Similarly, if a president wields his normally legal executive power for the purpose of halting the investigation of himself or his associates, he acts with an “improper purpose” to obstruct justice. . . .

I do think Mr. Mueller will ultimately say that a charge of felony obstruction will lie — against 45. And he will refer it to Congress for articles of impeachment. And I do believe there will be principled Republicans who will vote those Articles — all within a year. There you have it. Onward — to a new week!

UPDATE: Here is a bit of the preexisting federal immigration law applicable to grandparents — from the six countries:

. . .The Supreme Court has expressly held that an individual suffers a constitutionally cognizable injury if the Government interferes with his relationship with his “uncles, aunts, cousins, and especially grandparents,” all of whom it has expressly described as “close relatives.” Moore v. City of E. Cleveland, 431 U.S. 494, 503 (1977); see also, e.g., Overton v. Bazzetta, 539 U.S. 126, 131 (2003) (noting constitutional “right to maintain certain familial relationships, including * * * association between grandchildren and grandparents”). It is indisputable that the exclusion of these individuals would inflict a more substantial injury than the harm from being unable to hear “a lecturer”. . . .

Other immigration provisions enable an individual to seek admission on behalf of “[g]randchild(ren)” and “[n]iece[s] or nephew[s]”; to apply for asylum if a “grandparent, grandchild, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew” resides in the United States; to apply for naturalization on behalf of a grandchild; or to qualify as a special immigrant if he is the “grandparent” of a U.S. person. Even if these laws were relevant—and the Court gave no indication that they are—they would provide only further confirmation that the Court’s order extends to the very same “close blood relatives” the Government has categorically excluded. Reno, 507 U.S. at 310. . . .

Now you know.
नमस्ते

In Hawaii — Re-Establishing That Grandparents are “Close Relatives” [Insanity Alert].

July 9, 2017 - Leave a Response

I’ve hinted at it before — but now I am convinced of it. Mr. Trump has apparently instructed his underlings to violate the letter of the U.S. Supreme Court’s order, of last month.

That was an order granting a hearing in October — not resetting his authority in any form of broad terms. US immigration law has long held that grandparents are close relatives for the purpose of seeking asylum. Yet 45 now moves to exclude them — from the six countries. The Supreme’s cert. grant order was limited to preserving existing law — not creating new law.

I will stop there for now — but there is much more. The latest, from the very able US DC Judge Derrick K. Watson in Honolulu: “The Court is in receipt of Plaintiffs’ Motion to Enforce or, In the Alternative, to Modify Preliminary Injunction. Dkt. No. 328. Defendants shall file their opposition by Tuesday, July 11, 2017. Plaintiffs shall file any reply by Wednesday, July 12, 2017. The parties’ opposition and reply briefs are limited to no more than 15 pages each.” And a bit from the motion, filed on Saturday (yesterday), out of the State of Hawaii:

. . . .One thing is clear: This Court should not permit the Government to flout its directives at the expense of countless Americans
and their loved ones, and it possesses the authority to prevent the Government from so doing. . . .

As “partially limit[ed]” by “the Supreme Court’s order,” this Court’s injunction prohibits the Government from excluding aliens who have “a bona fide relationship with an individual or entity in the United States.” Slip Op. at 12. The Government cannot categorically exclude grandparents, nieces, or refugees with extensive ties to this country; and its ongoing efforts to do so should be enjoined. . . .

I predict he able Judge Watson will rule that Mr. Trump cannot treat grandparents any differently than “close family” — they are close family. Now you know. Onward, on a glorious Wisconsin triathlete’s top five finish Sunday morning! Smile. . .

नमस्ते

Ancillary Merck Biz Dev Updates Dept.: Kenilworth’s Stake In BeiGene Became 38% More Valuable — In One Day…

July 7, 2017 - Leave a Response

We last looked in on Merck’s very fortuitous investment in, and relationship with BeiGene in March of 2017. [More background here — on what was originally a $10 million investment by Kenilworth — now worth high hundreds of millions, including money already taken off the table.]

On Wednesday (while I was busily writing on the Martin Shkreli felonies prosecution in Brooklyn), Celgene did a multi-part, multi-asset deal with BeiGene, related to BeiGene’s PD-1 candidate (and related Asian hard assets). Do go read the link below for all the details, but BeiGene stock popped about 38 per cent on the news, over the last two sessions — nicely increasing the value of Merck’s nearly seven per cent stake in the Chinese newly public company.

The price Celgene actually paid for the stock is hard to determine, since part of that price was the transfer of Celgene’s China facilities and business operations. So we cannot compare Merck’s stake directly to the cash recited in exchange for Celgene’s six per cent of BeiGene. But I guarantee that Mr. Frazier is smiling about his investment, now.

The bite, from Xconomy New York, then:

. . . .The deal announced late Wednesday calls for Celgene to pay $263 million up front in licensing fees for global rights to BeiGene’s lead cancer drug in solid tumors. BeiGene keeps the right to develop and commercialize the drug in Asia, except for Japan, whose rights go to Celgene. If Celgene succeeds in developing the drug and commercializing it, the company could owe BeiGene as much as $980 million in milestone payments.

The transaction also includes equity. While Celgene has agreed to pay $150 million for a 5.9 percent ownership stake in its partner, BeiGene will take over Celgene’s China operations. The deal also grants BeiGene rights to manage the sales and marketing of three Celgene cancer drugs that are already approved in China.

The centerpiece of the deal is BeiGene’s lead compound, BGB-A317. The antibody drug is in a class of cancer treatments called checkpoint inhibitors. These drugs block the PD-1 protein, which some cancers can use to avoid detection by the body’s immune system. BeiGene developed its drug for targeting solid tumors as well as blood-borne cancers. . . .

Have an excellent weekend, one and all — do go enjoy your celebrations — as my biggest boy (and lil’est baby-girl) are having a special weekend, too. . . . smile.

नमस्ते

[U] Cassini Saturnian Ring Plunge No. 12 Completed — Signal Acquired! Underway Right Now

July 6, 2017 - Leave a Response

We are now more than halfway — to the dramatic death-burn, and vanishing, in silence — of September 15, 2017.

This is the midpoint of orbit 12 — of 22, in this ever tightening orbit series — each a foreshadowing of the noose, of sorts. On that September morning, local time — at the end point of orbit 22, twisty copper colored Cassini will be vaporized as she skims and glides, out of fuel — deeper and deeper — into Saturn’s atmosphere. . . a somewhat melancholy notion, indeed. . . .

But on this glorious summer’s morning, she is still performing revolutionary (pun intended!) gas giant planetary science. Here is the overview, from NASA’s mission logs:

. . . .During this orbit, Cassini’s Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) stares at the star Kappa Canis Majoris, as parts of the C ring and A ring pass between the spacecraft and the star. The spacecraft’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) observes the occultation as well.

Cassini’s imaging cameras, the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS), observes some of Saturn’s known ring propeller features, then targets the border region of the F ring and A ring to study ring dynamics there.

Cassini’s UVIS instrument also studies small-scale structures in the rings.

During this orbit’s ring-plane crossing, the spacecraft is oriented such that its high-gain antenna (the big dish) faces forward (called “HGA to RAM”) to help shield the spacecraft from ring particles.

Also during ring-plane crossing, in the brief period in which impacts are most likely, the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument “listens” for the impacts of ring particles, which produce detectable plasma clouds when they strike the spacecraft. The antenna protrudes several meters beyond the protection of the high-gain antenna and so still detects impacts. . . .

During this orbit, Cassini gets within 2,320 miles (3,730 kilometers) of Saturn’s 1-bar level. Cassini also passes within 2,470 miles (3,980 kilometers) of the inner edge of Saturn’s D ring. . . .

Now you know — and [UPDATED!] we have seen (thus the new masthead!) should see a signal acquisition ping, from the beautifully twisting lil’ shepherded moon-let, as she moves with truly unwasted grace (conserving fuel all the while) — after midnight local, tonight. . . that will indicate she is safe, sound, hale and whole — and still sprinting about the planet. . . preparing ultimately for her. . . fiery demise.


Onward, on a gorgeous July morning — in a ferociously gleaming city. Smile.

नमस्ते

Arriving Late To The FDA’s Multiple Myeloma Pembrolizumab Pomalidomide Lenalidomide Halt Decision — But Merck Likely To Open Off Tomorrow…

July 5, 2017 - Leave a Response

We were (quite happily) out, and off grid all night — with our fun-loving adult kids, and so arrive here after midnight on Tuesday/early Wednesday — to express our concern. There was a foreshadowing of all this, at mid-June 2017 with the studies’ safety monitors imposing a pause, in enrollments. But now FDA has stopped these studies in total. I would expect a one to two per cent additional decline in Merck’s NYSE price, beyond the decline in the after-hours session on the NASDAQ, tonight. Sad news, but patients (and patient safety — i.e., “first, do no harm“) must come first.

Much has already been written, in the financial press — so I’ll simply quote the full release here. Some of the most difficult news appears near the end of the presser, with some specificity around non-disease-progression related deaths (even in other cancers):

. . . .The FDA has determined that the data available at the present time indicate that the risks of KEYTRUDA plus pomalidomide or lenalidomide outweigh any potential benefit for patients with multiple myeloma. All patients enrolled in KEYNOTE-183 and KEYNOTE-185 and those in the KEYTRUDA /lenalidomide /dexamethasone cohort in KEYNOTE-023 will discontinue investigational treatment with KEYTRUDA. This clinical hold does not apply to other studies with KEYTRUDA. . . .

KEYTRUDA (pembrolizumab) was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 5% of 210 patients with cHL, and treatment was interrupted due to adverse reactions in 26% of patients. Fifteen percent (15%) of patients had an adverse reaction requiring systemic corticosteroid therapy. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 16% of patients. The most frequent serious adverse reactions (≥1%) included pneumonia, pneumonitis, pyrexia, dyspnea, GVHD, and herpes zoster. Two patients died from causes other than disease progression; one from GVHD after subsequent allogeneic HSCT and one from septic shock. The most common adverse reactions (occurring in ≥20% of patients) were fatigue (26%), pyrexia (24%), cough (24%), musculoskeletal pain (21%), diarrhea (20%), and rash (20%). . . .

KEYNOTE-052, KEYTRUDA was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 11% of 370 patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. The most common adverse reactions (in ≥20% of patients) were fatigue (38%), musculoskeletal pain (24%), decreased appetite (22%), constipation (21%), rash (21%), and diarrhea (20%). Eighteen patients (5%) died from causes other than disease progression. Five patients (1.4%) who were treated with KEYTRUDA experienced sepsis which led to death, and 3 patients (0.8%) experienced pneumonia which led to death. Adverse reactions leading to interruption of KEYTRUDA occurred in 22% of patients; the most common (≥1%) were liver enzyme increase, diarrhea, urinary tract infection, acute kidney injury, fatigue, joint pain, and pneumonia. Serious adverse reactions occurred in 42% of patients, the most frequent (≥2%) of which were urinary tract infection, hematuria, acute kidney injury, pneumonia, and urosepsis.

In KEYNOTE-045, KEYTRUDA was discontinued due to adverse reactions in 8% of 266 patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. The most common adverse reaction resulting in permanent discontinuation of KEYTRUDA was pneumonitis (1.9%). Adverse reactions leading to interruption of KEYTRUDA occurred in 20% of patients; the most common (≥1%) were urinary tract infection (1.5%), diarrhea (1.5%), and colitis (1.1%). The most common adverse reactions (≥20%) in patients who received KEYTRUDA vs those who received chemotherapy were fatigue (38% vs 56%), musculoskeletal pain (32% vs 27%), pruritus (23% vs 6%), decreased appetite (21% vs 21%), nausea (21% vs 29%), and rash (20% vs 13%). Serious adverse reactions occurred in 39% of KEYTRUDA-treated patients, the most frequent (≥2%) of which were urinary tract infection, pneumonia, anemia, and pneumonitis. . . .

Now you know. I would expect some share price declines at BMS and at Roche/Genentech as well, in the morning — as (at least at this early stage) there would be little reason not to think this might be a class wide effect, with the Celgene agent(s). But we shall see. G’night to all of good will — and in unrelated news, Cassini is completing Ring Plunge 12 as I type this. . . we should see a twisty, copper colored “signal acquired” confirmation — by tomorrow night. . . .

नमस्ते

What A Iceberg The Size Of Delaware Might Look Like — Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf/Berg

July 5, 2017 - Leave a Response

The European Space Agency — using its CryoSat satellite instrument package, and its Copernicus Sentinel-1 craft — has today modeled what the most massive ice-berg in history might well look like — when it calves. See at right. But it will calve, no doubt. It is too massive, and the crack, just too deep — for any other outcome. Physics tells no jokes.

A solid block of of ice, free floating, roughly the size of Delaware (or Galway, if that’s your Irish perspective) — will be the largest that has ever been witnessed in recorded human history. Thanks, climate change. From ESA.int, then — a bit:

. . . .All eyes are on Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf as a deep crack continues to cut across the ice, leaving a huge chunk clinging on. When it eventually gives way, one of the largest icebergs on record will be set adrift. . . .

Noel Gourmelen from the University of Edinburgh said, “Using information from CryoSat, we have mapped the elevation of the ice above the ocean and worked out that the eventual iceberg will be about 190 m thick and contain about 1155 cubic kilometres of ice.


“We have also estimated that the depth below sea level could be as much as 210 m. . . .”

Of course, it could break apart nearly immediately, spawning hundreds of smaller bergs, sooner or later, but there will be no way to know. . . until it happens. But it will happen. That is now a mathematical/earth sciences physics certainty. Tonight — next week, next month — or in 2018, but likely before 2019.

Now you know. City fun today, in between office work, with my fantastic adult offspring in town, and visiting [doin’ all the “Ferris Bueller” stuff — 1:20 PM Cubs and. . . (“I’m Abe Fromann — the sausage king of Chicago!. . .”)] — until Sunday night, now! Onward. . . .

नमस्ते

Great “Copper” Red Spot Viewings: Moonlet Juno Science Pass Number Six, Soon At Mighty Jupiter…

July 3, 2017 - Leave a Response

If you could sprint by (all in a blur!) — just a few thousand miles above an unimaginably vast (by Earth scales) shimmering, and twisting copper-colored, certain to be glistening, even in the low lights — fairly-boiling hurricane, a storm that would swallow three Earths whole, and one that has been raging for over 300 years — would you take. . . the ride?

I know I would — if I could. It was just exactly a year ago, tonight, that we were holding our breath, awaiting word that Juno had achieved a stable orbital insertion/capture, via Lord Jupiter’s immense and crushing gravity. Here one year and seven days on, we will get our first close up data and pictures. . . of the so-called Great Red Spot (in fact, though — in the gloaming light around Jupiter, it is much more a. . . copper colored spot — thus the headline).

So do tune back in on the late evening of July 10, Eastern time. Until then, here’s a bit of the detail, from NASA’s JPL:

. . . .Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, the gas giant’s iconic, 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. This will be humanity’s first up-close and personal view of the gigantic feature — a storm monitored since 1830 and possibly existing for more than 350 years.

“Jupiter’s mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “This monumental storm has raged on the solar system’s biggest planet for centuries. Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating science instruments will dive in to see how deep the roots of this storm go, and help us understand how this giant storm works and what makes it so special.”

The data collection of the Great Red Spot is part of Juno’s sixth science flyby over Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops. Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s center) will be on Monday, July 10, at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno will be about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno will have covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and will be directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. The spacecraft will pass about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Giant Red Spot clouds. All eight of the spacecraft’s instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, will be on during the flyby.Just days after celebrating its first anniversary in Jupiter orbit, NASA’s Juno spacecraft will fly directly over Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, the gas giant’s iconic, 10,000-mile-wide (16,000-kilometer-wide) storm. This will be humanity’s first up-close and personal view of the gigantic feature — a storm monitored since 1830 and possibly existing for more than 350 years.

“Jupiter’s mysterious Great Red Spot is probably the best-known feature of Jupiter,” said Scott Bolton, principal investigator of Juno from the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio. “This monumental storm has raged on the solar system’s biggest planet for centuries. Now, Juno and her cloud-penetrating science instruments will dive in to see how deep the roots of this storm go, and help us understand how this giant storm works and what makes it so special.”

The data collection of the Great Red Spot is part of Juno’s sixth science flyby over Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops. Perijove (the point at which an orbit comes closest to Jupiter’s center) will be on Monday, July 10, at 6:55 p.m. PDT (9:55 p.m. EDT). At the time of perijove, Juno will be about 2,200 miles (3,500 kilometers) above the planet’s cloud tops. Eleven minutes and 33 seconds later, Juno will have covered another 24,713 miles (39,771 kilometers) and will be directly above the coiling crimson cloud tops of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot. The spacecraft will pass about 5,600 miles (9,000 kilometers) above the Giant Red Spot clouds. All eight of the spacecraft’s instruments as well as its imager, JunoCam, will be on during the flyby. . . .

Smiling ear to ear, in seven days’ time. . . . but tonight — off to the [collateral family’s] club, for early fireworks, and some hot air ballooning. . . .

नमस्ते